Category Archives: Humanity

Old Timey Photos (from ViralDoza)

Before automatic pinsetters were invented, “pin boys” worked to manually line them up. (1914).

Before automatic pinsetters were invented,

Sarcastic photo taken by anti-prohibitionists to mock their opponents in 1919.

Sarcastic photo taken by anti-prohibitionists to mock their opponents in 1919.

A police officer on a Harley and an old fashioned mobile holding cell. (1921)

A police officer on a Harley and an old fashioned mobile holding cell. (1921)

An early example of “horsemanning”, the 1920′s version of “planking”.

An early example of

Two winners of a 1922 Beauty Pageant, when beauty standards were much different.

Two winners of a 1922 Beauty Pageant, when beauty standards were much different.

shorpy

An beach official measures bathing suits to ensure they aren’t too short (1920s)

An beach official measures bathing suits to ensure they aren't too short (1920s)

Suits were not allowed to end more than 6 inches above the knee.

A couple enjoys an old fashioned zipline on a weekend afternoon. (1923)

A couple enjoys an old fashioned zipline on a weekend afternoon. (1923)

This bizarre helmet supposedly helped focus by rendering the wearer deaf, piping them full of oxygen, and limiting their vision to a tiny slit. (1925)

This bizarre helmet supposedly helped focus by rendering the wearer deaf, piping them full of oxygen, and limiting their vision to a tiny slit. (1925)

A mildly terrifying 1920s full faced swimming mask designed to protect women from the sun.

A mildly terrifying 1920s full faced swimming mask designed to protect women from the sun.

Hitler rehearsing his speeches in front of a mirror (1925).

Hitler rehearsing his speeches in front of a mirror (1925).

The LA Public Library’s bookmobile program for the sick. (1928)

The LA Public Library’s bookmobile program for the sick. (1928)

A zookeeper gives penguins a delightful shower from a watering can. (1930)

A zookeeper gives penguins a delightful shower from a watering can. (1930)

The One Wheel Motorcycle, capable of reaching a top speed of 93 mph. (1931)

The One Wheel Motorcycle, capable of reaching a top speed of 93 mph. (1931)

A cat poses for a cigarette card, found in Army Club Cigarettes. (1932)

A cat poses for a cigarette card, found in Army Club Cigarettes. (1932)

How makers of the famous London Double-Decker buses proved they weren’t a tipping hazard. (1933)

How makers of the famous London Double-Decker buses proved they weren't a tipping hazard. (1933)

Baby cages for 1930s apartment families who wanted their children to get enough sunlight.

Baby cages for 1930s apartment families who wanted their children to get enough sunlight.

The iconic photo of a concerned pea-picker and mother of seven children during the Dust Bowl (1936)

The iconic photo of a concerned pea-picker and mother of seven children during the Dust Bowl (1936)

These glasses were specifically made for reading in bed

These glasses were specifically made for reading in bed

The 1930′s version of a GPS: This auto scrolling map was supposed to help people with directions in real time.

The 1930's version of a GPS: This auto scrolling map was supposed to help people with directions in real time.

Model T “Elevator Garage” in Chicago. (1936)

Model T

Salvador Dalí and Coco Chanel sharing a smoke. (1938)

Salvador Dalí and Coco Chanel sharing a smoke. (1938)

“Face Cones”: a fashionable way to protect oneself during snowstorms (1939).

A bicycle that fits a family of four, including a sewing machine. (1939).

A bicycle that fits a family of four, including a sewing machine. (1939).

Babies wearing the gas mask hood system during a 1940 London bombing drill.

Babies wearing the gas mask hood system during a 1940 London bombing drill.

WWII soldiers get their last kiss before deployment.

WWII soldiers get their last kiss before deployment.

A tiny puppy sleeping comfortably between Russian soldiers. (1945)

A tiny puppy sleeping comfortably between Russian soldiers. (1945)

An Austrian boy couldn’t be more excited about his first pair of new shoes in years. (1946)

An Austrian boy couldn't be more excited about his first pair of new shoes in years. (1946)

misslucifer

A baby bear drinks a bowl of honey in a cafe. (1950)

A baby bear drinks a bowl of honey in a cafe. (1950)

A man dresses up his dog in a suit, then puts a cat in his lap. (1950s)

A man dresses up his dog in a suit, then puts a cat in his lap. (1950s)

An ice-cold whisky dispenser, sometimes found in offices. (1950s)

An ice-cold whisky dispenser, sometimes found in offices. (1950s)

The winner of the 1950 “Miss Atomic Bomb” pageant.

The winner of the 1950

Afghan women at a public library during the 1950s.

Afghan women at a public library during the 1950s.

The Afghanistan government was shifting towards democracy in the 1950s and 60s before the Taliban took over. Women could work, become educated, dress casually and use many of the modern day services that men could.

A young Paul McCartney takes a mirror selfie. (1959)

A young Paul McCartney takes a mirror selfie. (1959)

[Colorized] Young women hosting a 1950s house party.

[Colorized] Young women hosting a 1950s house party.

Fidel Castro lays a wreath at the Lincoln Memorial. (1959)

Fidel Castro lays a wreath at the Lincoln Memorial. (1959)

The Cat-Mew Machine. (1963)

The Cat-Mew Machine. (1963)

This Japanese machine meows times per minute to scare away rats and mice. The eyes light up too.

A young woman takes her pet lobster out for a walk.

A young woman takes her pet lobster out for a walk.

Young boy attending Martin Luther King Jr’s “I Have a Dream” speech, 28th Aug 1963.

Young boy attending Martin Luther King Jr's

reddit.com

The “TV Glasses” that never quite caught on. (1963)

The

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Norwegian teen gets the stupidest tattoo in the history of stupid tattoos

, Rare Staff

There are bad decisions. There are terrible decisions. And then there is the decision that Stian Ytterdahl of Lorenskog, Norway made on Tuesday.

The 18-year-old was goaded by his friends to get a tattoo of a McDonald’s receipt on his forearm. It was allegedly punishment for the teen “being too friendly with the ladies.”

Ytterdahl had the choice between the receipt on his forearm and a Barbie tattoo on his butt. The Norwegian teen decided to go with McDonald’s golden arches rather than Barbie’s golden locks.

“Now I’m a living billboard,” Ytterdahl said.

“But I think all this is just fun. Maybe it won’t be as fun when I’m 50 or 60 years old, but it’s my choice.”

h/t to The Huffington Post

– See more at: http://rare.us/story/norwegian-teen-gets-the-stupidest-tattoo-in-the-history-of-stupid-tattoos/#sthash.tzaA8nqb.dpuf

In Defense of Hippies

(crossposted from the front page of My Left Wing)

First of all, the stereotype for hippies is about as reliable as the stereotype for any other people, that is to say not at all.  Hippy culture was never monolithic.  It encompassed well over half of every kind of kid there was in the late 60s and early 70s, and spanned every socio-economic strata of American society.  If you weren’t a hippy in those days, what you know and think about hippies is probably wrong.  It’s not your fault.  The media has distorted the reality as a part of the conservative culture wars.
 They are, and have always been, threatened by hippies who never had any trouble seeing straight through them and who consistently called them on their bullshit.  Progressivism (or enlightened thinking), started well before the age of the hippies, but for that one seminal decade, hippies were its natural home (though not exclusively of course).

 What do you think when you hear the term hippy?  Most likely you think of spaced out goofballs without anything more than a tenuous connection to reality, mildly dangerous dope fiends who blather endlessly about inane bullshit, or hippy-dippy airheads without an intelligent thought or coherent idea worth noting.  That kind of outrageous distortion is what a conservative and unprincipled media is capable of doing.  Were there people who approached the stereotype somewhat?  Sure – somewhat, although practically no one is that goofy or detached from reality.  Was that a majority?  No, not even nearly so in my experience.  It was at most a distinct minority, and again none of them were as goofy as the conservative propaganda has many believing.  It’s all a rightwing `big lie’, just like the one about liberals being idiots, or pacifists being pushovers.  No truth to it, just a big ugly lie told over and over to `catapult the  propoganda

 

 

Continue reading In Defense of Hippies

Rita at the shooting gallery

Amsterdam-based publisher Erik Kessels has produced 12 books of weird, often surreal, domestic photos, never intended for publication. Here are some of funniest, most enigmatic and inexplicably heartwarming pictures from his collection

Read more about the pictures here

Kessel Kramer Publishing. From In Almost Every Picture Vol 7. 1951 Tilburg.
Rita in the shooting gallery.
Kessel Kramer Publishing. From In Almost Every Picture Vol 7. 1938 Tilburg.
Rita in the shooting gallery.
Kessel Kramer Publishing. From In Almost Every Picture Vol 7. 1997 Tilburg.
Rita in the shooting gallery.
Kessel Kramer Publishing. From In Almost Every Picture Vol 7. 2006 Tilburg 25 July_with fanclub.

 

Girl grows up among wild animals

  • Tippi was photographed growing up alongside wild animals in Africa.  Both of the girl’s parents are nature photographers, which explains   everything.

    Prior to Tippi being born, her French parents relocated their family to NamibiaAfrica. This is where the little girl was able to make friends with some of the world’s most feared and admired animals like lions, tigers and cheetahs. She also hung out with elephants and zebras.

    Instead of having their daughter grow up around peer pressure, drama and toxic preschool friends, her parents’ chose a completely different route. The best part is that they captured the photos and chose to share their daughter’s childhood with the world. How selfless! Check them out below.

    baby1

    baby2baby3baby4baby5baby6baby7baby8baby9baby10baby12baby13baby14baby15baby16

    H/T: NegPoz, Photos courtesy of Tippi: My Book Of Africa

 

A Story of Trust (new book by Shreve Stockton)

Saved from certain death
Charlie the coyote owes his life to a whim. A worker with Wyoming Wildlife Services was tasked with killing coyotes that had attacked sheep, but he had an odd compulsion to save one of the pups. Though he didn’t fully understand why he did it, he handed the 10-day-old coyote pup to Shreve Stockton to raise. Stockton, a writer and photographer, took Charlie in — and how could she not, after looking at this tiny face?What happened next is a story of trust, an unbreakable loving bond formed with the “enemy,” and the beginning of a daily story told in photos to fans across the Internet.
coyote4
Raised by loving hands
“Now, on my second day with the coyote, soft light filled the cabin in the early afternoon. I nestled him between two pillows and dug around under my bureau for my camera,” Stockton writes in her book, “The Daily Coyote: A Story of Love, Trust and Survival in the Wilds of Wyoming.”

Picture

Soon to be a star
“Charlie and Eli were deep into their brotherhood,” Stockton writes of Charlie bonding to his tomcat friend. “On every walk, they stopped under a busy weed and crouched together, eating the tender grass that grew beneath it.” It’s not very common that people allow coyotes anywhere near their cats, but this pup had only love for the orange tabby.

(Text: Jaymi Heimbuch)

Picture 

Burying herself in research and dedication to the survival of the coyote pup, Stockton readied herself for unknown challenges.

Meanwhile, Charlie made friends with Eli the tomcat.

Shreve Stockton on Amazon

  

Self-Portraits Show Artist’s Descent Into Alzheimer’s

Self-Portraits Show Artist’s Descent Into Alzheimer’s

After being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease in 1995, artist William Mutermohlen set out to document himself slipping away through a series of self-portraits. The project spanned 8 years and shows the decline of his motor and perceptual skills as well as the emotional aspects associated with losing his reality. Mutermohlen’s project has helped psychologists to better understand this disease that affects over 1 in 8 elderly Americans and all of those who knew and loved them. See more self-portraits at WilliamUtermohlen.org and find out more behind this fascinating story in this New York Times article.

Written by Jessica Czeck

The Long Winter – Laura Ingalls Wilder

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I read the whole “Little House” series  ( about a young midwestern girl in the late 1800’s) when I was a in elementary school.  I decided to read The Long Winter again this year because it seemed fitting.  It HAS been a long winter here in the midwest!

This is a tale of a family near starvation, of a town crippled by lack of food when blizzards keep the supply train from reaching the settlers.

The first blizzard hits unexpectedly in October 1880. (which is early for a blizzard by any standards)   Anticipating a bad winter, the Ingalls family moves to De Smet, population 80, from their shanty a mile outside of town.

Blizzard after blizzard follows. The Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway, which serviced South Dakota and elsewhere across the Midwest, shuts down its supply trains in January as the snow piles too high for trains to pass through, at one point 12 feet in depth. Townspeople in De Smet carve tunnels to get from one building to the next.

By Christmas, the grocery store no longer has food and the family runs out of coal and kerosene. The Ingalls twist hay into sticks for fuel and switch to axle grease to light their home. “Winter had lasted so long that it seemed it would never really end. ” wrote Laura.

Then they run out of flour. To make bread, they grind wheat with a coffee mill. I have been wanting to start grinding my own wheat, but it is certainly a different thing when you HAVE to grind your own!

The family has to go down to two meals a day to save fuel.  It is potatoes and sourdough bread that keep them going.  It reminded me of the book Tobacco Road (where they eat nothing but turnips)

I can’t imagine living like that.   I would like to think that I would have the same attitude as Laura did though.  She was grateful for what they DID have.

These books were inspirational to me as a kid and I found the same is true for me as an adult.  Maybe even more so.

The REAL Ingalls family

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We are living in a hologram.

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