Tag Archives: art

The 100 best photographs ever taken without photoshop

Continue reading The 100 best photographs ever taken without photoshop

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Artwork by Steve Cutts

Sophie McAdam, True Activist

Steve Cutts is a London-based illustrator and animator who uses powerful images to criticize the sad state of society. Greed, environmental destruction, junk food and TV consumption, smartphone addiction and the exploitation of animals are all issues that have inspired his work.

Cutts worked in the corporate world before choosing to go freelance, and his vitriol for the rat race really shows (especially here…)

parody of the rat race
Cutts used to work at an advertising agency with global brand clients including Coca Cola, Google, Reebok, Magners, Kellogg’s, Virgin, 3, Nokia, Sony, Bacardi and Toyota. It’s no surprise he was left with so many ideas for these thought-provoking images.

His illustrations capture all the stress, despair and frustration of our dog-eat-dog world, one in which we are persuaded to consume sh*t and destroy the planet in order to keep the corporate wheels turning.

It’s true that Cutts’s art is depressing, but only because his images are so close to the truth. Here is a selection of some of his best works:

Arrrgh! It’s Monday again

Arrrgh! It's Monday again

Jessica and Roger relax at home

jessandroger

The Fatcat

fatcat

‘Evolution’

evolution

Dinner is served…

dinnerisserved

A bull provides the daily news through a cleverly designed toilet-TV

dailybullshit

‘circle of life’

circleoflife

Just another day in the office…

officeshit

This image in particular rings true for most of us

phoneslaves

A very apt illustration of humanity’s ecocide

recycling

Santa’s real workshop

santa

‘Scream Queen’

screamqueen

A critique of consumerism

shutupnbuy

‘The trap’

the trap

‘The final handshake’, from his short animation ‘MAN’.

thefinalhandshake

‘The King’

theking

If you like Steve’s work, please share this article. You can also check out his website or like his facebookpage.

All the Money You Made Will Never Buy Back Your Soul

Thanks, Jim, for letting me share this

Jim Nooney's profile photo

Jim Nooney

Sep 26, 2010
All The Money You Made Will Never Buy Back Your Soul“Let me ask you one question
Is your money that good
Will it buy you forgiveness
Do you think that it could
I think you will find
When your death takes its toll
All the money you made
Will never buy back your soul.”-Bob Dylan/”Masters Of War”Smithsonian Museum Of American History
Washington, D.C.

Exhibition: Mika Ninagawa

Exhibition: Mika Ninagawa

Viborg Kunsthal, Viborg, Denmark
Jan. 18 – May 4, 2014

Mika Ninagawa’s richly colored photos and movies often focus on magnifying details in extreme close-ups that provide an almost abstract image of reality. The particularly eye-catching aesthetics are kitsch in its exaggeration, but also poetic in its gentle and evocative images.

In a unique style, artist mixes a surreal universe with attractive visuals from the popular culture. For example by reference to older, Japanese geisha traditions and neoclassical films like “Kill Bill”. Both play with staging of sex, violence, weapons and beauty. In this manner, the works represent a special style that is particularly popular among Japan’s youth, but also within a wide international audience.

Mika Ninagawa (b. 1972) lives and works in Tokyo, Japan. She exhibited at Kunsthaus Graz, Austria; Centre National d’Art Contemporain, Grenoble, France; Mori Tower and Ueno Royal Museum, Tokyo, Japan, amongst many other places.

[from the press release by Viborg Kunsthal]

IMAGE: Mika Ninagawa, “on air” (Chiaki Kuriyama), 2004
©Mika Ninagawa, courtesy Galerie Priska Pasquer, Cologne

A course in Demonic Creativity

I am always looking for ‘free’ books to read online.  This title jumped out at me for obvious reasons.  It’s  an interesting, thought provoking book, for sure..

If you’ve never read it, and if you choose to do so now, I sincerely hope you find that it enhances your creative engagement with your own  muse.  (hopefully, not a demonic one)

A-Course-in-Demonic-Creativity-cover-image

 (click cover to read PDF)

DESCRIPTION

Where does creativity come from? Why do ideas and inspiration feel as if they come from “outside,” from an external source that’s separate from us but able to whisper directly into the mind? Why have so many writers throughout history — and also composers, painters, philosophers, mystics, and scientists — spoken of being guided, accompanied, and even haunted by a force or presence that not only serves as the deep source of their creative work but that exerts a kind of  gravitational pull on the shape of their lives?

The book’s starting point is the proposition that we all possess a higher or deeper intelligence than the everyday mind, and that learning to live and work harmoniously and energetically with this intelligence is the irreducible core of a successful artistic life. We can call this inner force the unconscious mind or the silent partner. We can call it the id or the secret self.

Your unconscious mind truly is your genius in the ancient sense of the word.  Befriending it as such, and interacting with it as if it really is a separate, collaborating presence in your psyche, puts you in a position to receive its gifts, and it in the position to give them to you.

About Matt Cardin

Matt Cardin is the author of DARK AWAKENINGS, DIVINATIONS OF THE DEEP, A COURSE IN DEMONIC CREATIVITY: A WRITER’S GUIDE TO THE INNER GENIUS, and the forthcoming TO ROUSE LEVIATHAN. He writes about the apocalyptic intersection of religion, horror, the paranormal, creativity, consciousness, and culture.

Self-Portraits Show Artist’s Descent Into Alzheimer’s

Self-Portraits Show Artist’s Descent Into Alzheimer’s

After being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease in 1995, artist William Mutermohlen set out to document himself slipping away through a series of self-portraits. The project spanned 8 years and shows the decline of his motor and perceptual skills as well as the emotional aspects associated with losing his reality. Mutermohlen’s project has helped psychologists to better understand this disease that affects over 1 in 8 elderly Americans and all of those who knew and loved them. See more self-portraits at WilliamUtermohlen.org and find out more behind this fascinating story in this New York Times article.

Written by Jessica Czeck